Kim Daneault
KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY / Metropolitan | 603-345-7783 | kim-d@kw.com


Posted by Kim Daneault on 11/19/2017

When you’re buying or selling a home, you may hear the terms, “assessed value” and “market value.” There are few things that you should know about these terms. First, they cannot be used interchangeably. The assessed value is generally much less than the market value. If you’re buying a home, you probably would rather see the assessed value of the home as a price! If you’re selling, the same holds true for the market value of the home for you.


Market Value Is Used Differently Than Assessed Value


The market value is how much your home is worth on the market currently. The definition is exactly as the term sounds the home is looked at by an assessor and given a value. The assessed value is used to determine property taxes, among other things. As you can imagine, the assessed value can become a point of contention for many homeowners especially when it comes to paying their tax bills. Many homes end up being assessed at a higher price than their current value, bringing tax bills to higher levels. The market value is what the home will sell for when it is listed for sale.


Be careful when searching for a home to buy. Many sites list the assessed value along with the price of the home or estimated market value of the home. You don’t want to get these numbers confused when budgeting and searching for the perfect house. 


If you’re getting ready to sell your home, pay little attention to the assessed value of the home. That is not what your home will sell for. 


The market value is a good reason to hire a realtor to help you sell your home. Realtors are experts in finding the market values of homes. They will even do something called a CMA (comparative market analysis) for you to help you determine the right price for your home to sell at. This is where comparable properties in the area are examined for their selling prices and all the perks of your home and neighborhood are considered. The market value is determined by the price of the homes that have recently been sold in the area based on the location of the home and how close it is to certain amenities like schools, parks, and the probability of future construction. 


Finally, know that the market value and the appraised value of a home have a lot to do with how much a lender will give you to buy the property. Every home that is being bought must go through an appraisal, to protect the lender from overpaying for a home.    


Whether you’re buying or selling a home, knowing your value terms can really be a help in understanding the sweet spot for pricing a property  





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Posted by Kim Daneault on 11/12/2017

Often in real estate, the saying goes that “a picture is worth a thousand words.” While pictures can help buyers to get more interested in a property, going a bit further in the listing description can help to get the property even more in-person views. If you work diligently with your real estate agent to create a great description of your home for sale. There’s a few simple tips to make sure that the listing description of your home will bring buyers knocking. 


Think Of Your Audience


Remember that one of the most important things in writing anything is to write it for the audience that you’re trying to reach. Who will actually be reading your home’s listing? Besides potential buyers, other realtors and home search engines will be glancing at your listing. This means that you have to meet a few different purposes with one description. Your description should include:


  • A clear, concise description of the home and its contents
  • Keywords
  • Important information surrounding the sale of the home including if it’s a short sale, foreclosure, etc.


The Limitations Of The MLS


The MLS is where homes are listed most often. It does not give a lot of room for creativity in listing descriptions. Keep in mind that you don’t want to repeat a lot of the same information throughout the description. For example, there’s no need to repeat that the home has 3 bedrooms and one bathroom multiple times. There is a property details section that lists all of these major factors about the property. It’s definitely to your benefit to include alluring features of the property that you think are unique and possibly hard to find. Describe something that you know other people will want to see. 


Improved Homes Are Attractive Homes


If you have made upgrades to a home such as new appliances, new kitchen countertops, or a new roof, make sure that you include that in the listing description. Buyers love homeowners who have taken good care of their homes. People are much more likely to buy a home that they believe is move-in ready. It’s much more comforting to buyers.


It’s What You Say And How You Say It


There’s a lot more clout behind certain words than others when it comes to real estate. These words make buyers more likely to act and go see a listing in person. The words you use can vary including those that describe:


  • The type of countertop
  • The landscape of the home
  • The condition of the home
  • The materials used within the home


Certain marketing buzzwords don’t work when it comes to selling a home. These include anything that sounds too good to be true like a “quiet” neighborhood, or stating that the home is ready to move into. While these things can be true, it’s often best to let the listing description lead buyers to see the home, and discover these bonus points for themselves.





Posted by Kim Daneault on 11/5/2017

Buying a home should be a quick, simple process. However, the homebuying cycle sometimes proves to be a hassle, particularly for those who are shopping for a house for the first time.

Lucky for you, there are many quick, easy ways to become a smart homebuyer – here are three tips to ensure you can make informed decisions throughout the homebuying journey.

1. Check Out a Broad Array of Houses

Purchasing a home can be a fun, exciting journey, especially if you explore a wide range of residences.

Remember, the more residences you check out, the more likely it becomes that you'll find one that matches or exceeds your expectations.

When you review houses, be sure to analyze each property's interior and exterior closely. That way, you can identify any problem areas and determine whether these issues are potential deal-breakers.

Also, don't hesitate to check out the same house multiple times. It never hurts to take a second look at a house. And if you find that you enjoy a home after a second walk-through, you may be ready to submit an offer on this residence.

2. Set a Homebuying Budget

Before you make an offer on a house, it is important to consider exactly what you can afford. By doing so, you can avoid the temptation to overspend in the hopes of acquiring your dream house.

Many homebuyers get pre-approved for a mortgage – something that may prove to be exceedingly valuable.

With pre-approval for a mortgage, a homebuyer will know exactly how much money he or she can spend on a home. This will enable a homebuyer to enter the housing market with a budget in hand and map out his or her home search accordingly.

Furthermore, consider your monthly expenses prior to submitting a home offer. Electricity and assorted utility expenses can add up quickly, so you'll want to account for these costs. And if you want cable and internet services at your new home, you'll want to evaluate these potential expenses as well.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a housing market professional, and as such, will help you simplify the process of going from homebuyer to homeowner.

Typically, a real estate agent will meet with you to understand your homebuying needs. He or she then will help you develop a homebuying strategy, one that ensures you can purchase your ideal house at a budget-friendly price.

With a real estate agent at your side, you should have no trouble acquiring a wonderful residence. This housing market professional will set up home showings, keep you up to date about new property listings and negotiate with home sellers on your behalf. As a result, a real estate agent will guarantee you can get the best results possible throughout the home selling journey.

Don't leave anything to chance as you kick off your home search. Instead, use the aforementioned tips, and you can become a smart home shopper in no time at all.




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Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/29/2017

Moving to a new house means big changes for everyone involved, but for a dog, it can be an especially confusing time. While you can talk to a child ahead of time to explain to them what to expect we, unfortunately, do not have the same ability to communicate with our beloved pets about the big changes ahead. The good news is, there are a few things you can do to make the move a smoother process for both you and your dog. Ahead of time - if it's close enough, visit the new house with your dog prior to moving to familiarize them with the new environment and neighborhood. Also, pack your dog's belongings (toys, bowls, bed, food) together so you can be prepared to pull it out first when you arrive at the new house. During the move - consider having your dog stay with a friend or doggy daycare on moving day. This will save your dog from the stress of their surroundings changing during the move. You also won't need to worry about where your dog is while doors are being left open or if they are underfoot during the moving process. If moving over a distance - take frequent breaks to let your dog out to walk around and avoid feeding him right before the journey in case they are prone to car sickness. Talk to your dog in a calm voice throughout the moving process to comfort them, they can pick up on our emotions so trying to remain calm yourself will cue to your animal that everything is okay. Stay safe - before letting your dog loose into your new yard you will want to ensure that it is free of potentially poisonous plants they may try to eat and check for any holes in fences they may try to squeeze through. You will also want to update your dog's tag and/or microchip with your new address and phone number. Maintain structure - keep old bedding and toys to give your dog some familiarity in their new environment. If you are looking forward to replacing their bed, waiting until your dog is settled into the new house is ideal. Stick to regular routines that were in place before the move where possible. This includes things like walks, feedings, and times you are away from the house. Have fun - when you arrive, allow your dog to explore the new house and yard. Take them for a walk around the new neighborhood, play their favorite game with them and get them tired out so they will be more relaxed when it's time to settle in for the night at home. Bonding time - spend quality time with your dog to reassure them that moving to the new home is a positive experience. Try to spend the first few days after the move at home with your dog to spend time with them and monitor how they are adjusting. Moving can be an exciting process for both you and your dog with a little bit of preparation. Setting up ahead of time before your dog's arrival to the new home and spending quality time together not only makes for a smoother move in experience but also gives you the opportunity to strengthen the bond between you and your dog!




Tags: moving tips   dogs   Dog safety  
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Posted by Kim Daneault on 10/22/2017

It makes good sense to buy a home on active duty, especially when you consider low mortgage interest rates, job stability and the range of approved Veteran’s Administration (VA) lenders. Buy a permanent home while serving on active duty and you could take advantage of home allowance assistance. Get a VA loan as soon as you qualify for the loan based on your length of military service and you could also use your home allowance to help pay off the life of your mortgage. Choosing the Right Location is Key Even with these benefits, you might drag your feet, opting to rent versus buy. It’s understandable. Few people relocate and move to a new house as frequently as active duty military members. Here are ways that you could determine if you’re ready to buy a permanent home on active duty and how to identify a permanent home location that may be right for you and your family. If you’re close to your immediate family and know that you're going to settle down in the town where you were born and raised after you finish your military service, you could buy a house there while you’re on active duty and rent the house out. You could even rent the house out to older relatives who are going to college or other active duty members stationed in the town. Feel a strong connection to an area you were stationed in? Discuss buying a home there with your family. Turn the house into a rental property until you complete active duty. Similar to how people rent out summer homes, you could only rent out your house while you’re away, and stay at the house during long vacations. Another option is to buy a permanent house where you’re currently stationed. If you're married, your spouse could live at the house if you're deployed or stationed away from home. If you choose this route, watch the housing market, so that you buy when housing prices, including interest rates, are down and sell when housing prices are up. Documents that Help Secure Military Mortgages After you identify where you want to live, start getting documentation together that you will need when you meet with lenders. Items that you may need to present to lenders include: • Tax returns • Letters from the Internal Revenue Service laying out a payment plan should you be behind on paying your taxes • Bank statements • Monthly credit union statements • Housing allowance assistance documents (that show how much housing allowance you receive each month) • Statement of Service • Certificate of Eligibility • Proof of residency • Paystubs • Driver’s license or passport Work with reputable lenders. Make sure that you can absorb your current living expenses as well as pay for a permanent home. Should you make adjustments to pay off a permanent home, such as renting out a portion or all of the house, while you’re in the military, you could be able to keep more of your retirement pay.







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